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Research and Internships

UT and the College of Natural Sciences has some incredible resources from the Counseling and Mental Health Center to the Health Professions Office. However, so many resources can sometimes become an obstacle when trying to find the right resource for you in a swarm of other resources. Also, how can you tell what a resource is targeted at or how useful it really is? We don't want you to be bogged down by these questions when you're trying to reach out and get help in any area. Thus, we have put together a list of significant UT and CNS resources. Enjoy!

Click the links below to find out more:

RESEARCH

What is Research?
Being Realistic About Research

How to Get Involved

Getting Involved in Research
Finding a Research Lab
How to Understand Research

Resources

Eureka
Emailing Professors
FRI - Freshman Research Initiative
Undergraduate Research Office
SURGe - Science Undergraduate Research Group
Organized Research Units of CNS

INTERNSHIPS

Methods of Searching

Applying Online
Networking Events
Career Fairs
Can't Find an Internship?

Internship Content

What Internships Are All About

Resources

Interview Tips

What is Research?

“Researchers develop new process for Alzheimer’s treatment.” We see headlines like this nearly everyday in our newspapers, on our Twitter feeds, and in scientific journals around the world. It feels almost mundane now to read about all of the amazing advances these researchers are making, from genetic medicine to quantum computing. Many of us are only exposed to the end result; what is often lost in translation is the actual methods these scientists employ to bring us new technology. ‘Research’ becomes almost a magical process by which one must simply put in enough money to get progress. But the truth behind research is far more nuanced than that - and for college students starting to get into research, understanding these nuanced details is critical for both their success and happiness in the field.

Read more about Carson's insights into research here!

 

Being Realistic About Research

Research is often shrouded in mystery; prevailing stereotypes depict mad geniuses performing mysterious miracles in their labs. Occasionally stereotypes have a grain of truth. After speaking with a tenured professor within the Chemistry department, Dr. Lauren Webb, I gained a deeper sense of the nature behind research. She explores the difficulties and the rewards of research throughout her experiences.

When asked what moment she thought of to capture the essence of research, Webb stated that is was “at 2 AM or so working in the lab, pulling my hair out.”

Read more about the underbelly of research here

 

Getting Involved in Research

Whether it’s for medical school or graduate school, or it’s just something you’re interested in pursuing, finding research can be both a compelling and a daunting task. Especially for younger students, it can be difficult to find out what kinds of research topics you’d be interested in, or what kinds of resources you can use to get more information on these topics. This article is intended to help guide your search, so that you can start doing great work on a subject that fascinates you sooner!

Find out more about Shishir's guide into research here!

 

Finding a Research Lab

As a lab manager for the Children’s Research Lab and a research assistant (RA) at the Biomedical Imaging Analysis Lab, I have had experience recruiting RAs for my lab and understanding what professors look for when filling positions in their lab. Here is a short list of advice I would give to students searching for research experience.

  1. Find an area of research that truly interests you
  2. Find a professor.
  3. Do research on the professor and their lab.
  4. Include specific objectives in your e-mail.
  5. Be respectful and professional.

Read more about Tracy's advice here!

 

How to Understand Research

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During research, when people read lab papers filled with endless paragraphs of information mixed with scientific jargon and strange-looking diagrams, it is almost tempting to just skim through it. Yet, I know simply reading the abstract or the captions only will not fully allow one to appreciate the science and  the intricacies behind the research. That is why you should always take the detour every time, whether stumbling upon a word that you do not know or a diagram that does not make sense at first glance, and spend that extra minute or hour or even day to make sure you understand the unknown. Piecing all the details in a research summary is like putting together a puzzle until you get to see the amazing discovery the researcher has accomplished.

Read Brian's full advice here!

 

Eureka

Coming Soon

 

Emailing Professors for Research

One of the rate-limiting steps for college students to performing research is appropriately getting in contact with professors and asking them to join their lab to perform research. Writing that email which initiates your expression of interest to the lab PI (primary investigator – lab jargon) can make or break your acceptance into their lab. It should be well written, informed, and succinct – or else they may not feel it is worth their time to even reply! In this article, we go over some of the important details for writing an “expression of interest research email.”

Let’s break it down. There are 5 key parts to the email namely which are: opening, introduction, experience, personal statement, and the ending.

Click here to go into the depths of the email portions!

 

FRI - Freshman Research Initiative

In addition to our comprehensive FRI overview with student feedback, the Catalyst also managed to get ahold of Dr. Eman Ghanem, Assistant Director of Student Experience of the Freshman Research Initiative. In the following interview, Dr. Ghanem talks about both what students should consider going into stream sort and the overall value of the FRI program.

Click here to read the full interview!

 

Undergraduate Research Office

Coming Soon

 

SURGe - Science Undergraduate Research Group

SURGe is your bridge between being a student and being a part of a broader community of scholars. Every week SURGe holds meetings for members to come and listen to professors talk about their research fields, meet others with similar interests, and get in touch with their inner scientist. After meetings you will have the opportunity to meet these professors and learn about getting into their lab, or another that you could be referred to. You can get context on a topic that has caught your attention and become an important part of academic discussion which is vital to research, just like being an original thinker. Join SURGe to find out what research opportunities there are for you!

Read the full article about SURGe here!

 

Organized Research Units of CNS

Find the list of official CNS labs here -- this can help you find out what's out there!

 

Applying Online

Coming Soon

 

Networking Events

Coming Soon

 

Career Fairs

The Technology and Science Career Fair is an event where various technology related companies will be setting up booths and looking for potential recruits from the university. Over 100 large companies will be there, including Amazon, Google, and JP Morgan. This a prime opportunity for students to secure internship or job positions with Fortune 500 companies while still being in school. The event is naturally quite intimidating for many students, and it’s easy to feel overwhelmed given the grand scale of the event. Therefore, we recommend following our five step guide to the Technology and Science Career Fair to have the best possible experience.

  1. Come Prepared
  2. Dress Professionally
  3. Make sure your resume is up to date
  4. Take notes during your conversations
  5. Be honest

To read the full tips, access the article here!

 

Can't Find an Internship?

The hunt for an internship has been going for months - you went to career fairs, spent hours applying online, and wrote enough cover letters to fill a textbook - and yet, come April, nobody has come calling. What gives?

If you’re ready to throw up your hands and give up on an internship, you’re not alone. But giving up isn’t an option. Here are a few steps you can take, starting today, to not only improve your chances for next year but leave you feeling content along the way.

  1. Ask yourself whether your major actually requires internships
  2. Analyze what may have prevented you from getting an offer
  3. Make a plan

To get the full details of Carson's advice, click here!

 

 

What Internships Are All About

Coming Soon

 

Interview Tips

The thrill of finally getting a response wears off, and you suddenly realize something - you’ve got an interview tomorrow. The panic sets in, the anxiety begins to take over, and you almost wish you’d never applied in the first place. We’ve all been there.

Luckily, there’s a simple, three step process that can help you ace any interview, no matter how important it is. Disclaimer: nothing is guaranteed.

  1. Prepare
  2. Sell yourself, not your resume
  3. Remember - you're interviewing them too

Read all of the interview tips here! Happy hunting!