Using the Counseling and Mental Health Center

Using the Counseling and Mental Health Center

EVA FREDERICK

Here’s a nice stock photo of the Tower from Wikimedia Commons (there were no public domain images of the student services building)

 

UT has a myriad of resources available for students to use, but navigating them can be tricky when you are bombarded with information from every angle. Here’s a quick breakdown of the resources provided by UT’s Counseling and Mental Health Center, and some common questions about them. For information straight from the CMHC, visit https://cmhc.utexas.edu/aboutcmhc.html

 

Online self-assessment: This anonymous online questionnaire screens for thirteen of the most common mental health conditions you might encounter as a college student. These include depression, anxiety, and ADHD. The questionnaire is not the same as a diagnosis, but can be helpful in identifying problems and figuring out what to do next. The online form can be found at http://www.ulifeline.org/self_evaluator

 

Individual counseling: CMHC is perhaps best known for its excellent counseling services that it provides for a relatively low price. Students can sign up for single sessions or for a series of several. Schedule appointments here.

 

Counseling groups: the CMHC offers a variety of groups, classes and workshops to help students with various concerns. Some, like the Mindfulness Meditation Group and Overcoming Anxiety with Yoga and Mindfulness provide outlets for students through physical activity. Others, such as Black Voices: A Supportive Group for Black Students and its Latinx, Queer and Asian counterparts, provide a safe place for students to talk with others who share their identities.  Find the full list here.

 

24/7 CMHC Crisis Line: This 24/7/365 line is for students who have immediate mental health concerns, such as extreme anxiety, suicidal thoughts, or other urgent problems. The counselors answering

 

How is this different from UT’s Behavior Concerns Advice Line?

 

BCAL is another 24/7 advice line advertised at UT, but it serves an entirely different purpose from the CMHC Crisis Line. What actually is the Behavior Concerns Advice Line, and when is the appropriate time to use it? The BCAL is a way to voice your concerns about the behavior of other students, when you are not sure how to help them yourself. It is important to be aware that one of BCAL’s main purposes is a means of reporting behavior problems, so incidences you report to BCAL may open up further investigations.

 

Voices Against Violence: VAV is an organization within CMHC that provides programs dedicated to preventing and responding to interpersonal violence. You can interact with VAV through plays they put on such as the

 

Mindful Eating Program: UT provides excellent information and services to students who may be suffering from eating disorders or disordered eating. To access resources from the Mindful Eating Program, visit: https://cmhc.utexas.edu/mindfuleating.html

 

MindBody Lab: UT’s MindBody Labs provide a different kind of resources than some of the other services at CMHC. These are self-paced guided programs and technologies which can help you understand how your mental state affects your physiology or just help you deal with stress.


 

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