Appreciating Science: From Teaching to Researching

Appreciating Science: From Teaching to Researching

BRIAN LIN

Chemistry. Biology. Physics. Those words used to bring fear right before a test but today, it inspires something greater than fear, something more powerful: courage― so much that I can not only confidently dedicate the next four years of my life to studying science, but also inspire others to do the same.

During my time tutoring at the Sanger Learning Center, most people normally come to the sessions just for answers. However, I’ve done  so much more than just tell them to memorize the Bohr model formula or recite endless, meaningless acronyms to memorize the components of a human eye. Instead, I always connect their questions to useful applications, whether drawing out the atom to show why the Bohr formula works the way it does or explain why rhodopsin is spelled that way, and how it works. I want people to view science not as a burden, but as a tool, as a new way to view this world.

During research, when people read lab papers filled with endless paragraphs of information mixed with scientific jargon and strange-looking diagrams, it is almost tempting to just skim through it. Yet, I know simply reading the abstract or the captions only will not fully allow one to appreciate the science and  the intricacies behind the research. That is why you should always take the detour every time, whether stumbling upon a word that you do not know or a diagram that does not make sense at first glance, and spend that extra minute or hour or even day to make sure you understand the unknown. Piecing all the details in a research summary is like putting together a puzzle until you get to see the amazing discovery the researcher has accomplished.


From teaching to researching science, it is all about having that extra ounce of enthusiasm and the will to examine the minute details. That is how one becomes a true scientist.

UT Energy Symposium

UT Energy Symposium

A Reflection Upon Young Conservatives and the Freedom of Speech

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